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Israeli cyber chief: Major attack on water systems thwarted

Had Israel’s National Cyber Directorate not detected the attack in real time, he said chlorine or other chemicals could have been mixed into the water source in the wrong proportions and resulted in a “harmful and disastrous” outcome.

But Unna said the attempted hacking into Israel’s water systems marked the first time in modern history that “we can see something like this aiming to cause damage to real life and not to IT or data.”

Israel and Iran are bitter foes who have engaged in years of covert battles that have included high-tech hacking and cyber attacks.

JERUSALEM (AP) - Israel’s national cyber chief Thursday officially acknowledged the country had thwarted a major cyber attack last month against its water systems, an assault widely attributed to arch-enemy Iran, calling it a “synchronized and organized attack” aimed at disrupting key national infrastructure.

It appears that this was a clear Israeli message to Iran, don’t dare to touch civilian systems, the water and electricity systems in Israel, which were attacked this past month.

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Documentary shows the development of the AKINCI drone

The documentary also took a look at the damage a drone can cause to an airplane wing.

The AKINCI drone is able to fly for up to 24 hours, has a maximum flight altitude of 40,000 feet, and is able to carry a payload with a maximum capacity of 2,976 pounds.

The documentary looks back on the last six months of development of the AKINCI drone up until it’s first flight.

A documentary on Turkey‘s first armed drone has been released on YouTube by arms maker Baykar Technologies.

The documentary was hit with backlash from much of the drone community with many of the negative uses only being shown in it.

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The Pacific Deterrence Initiative: Peace Through Strength in the Indo-Pacific

Second, the Pacific Deterrence Initiative will focus resources on key capability gaps to ensure U.S. forces have everything they need to compete, fight, and win in the Indo-Pacific.

The Pacific Deterrence Initiative would serve the same purpose, allowing Congress and the Pentagon to view the defense budget through a regional warfighting lens while increasing the visibility of options to advance U.S. priorities in the Indo-Pacific.

The Pacific Deterrence Initiative will improve the implementation of the National Defense Strategy in the Indo-Pacific, and incentivize the Pentagon to better prioritize the region in its annual budget process.

What the Pacific Deterrence Initiative Will Do The Pentagon is taking challenges in the Indo-Pacific seriously, and has made some important progress implementing the National Defense Strategy in the region.

By increasing security assistance resources dedicated to the Indo-Pacific, the Pacific Deterrence Initiative will help U.S. allies and partners build the capabilities they need to protect their sovereignty.

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Image of article 'Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship'

Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

The report submitted to Gilday on Wednesday was prepared by Adm. Robert Burke, the vice chief of naval operations, who had done a preliminary inquiry in April.

The acting Navy secretary at the time, Thomas Modly, ordered Crozier relieved of command in early April, saying he had distributed his letter too widely and shown poor judgment.

As the virus spread, the carrier pulled into Guam on March 27 amid apparent disagreement within Navy leadership over how to proceed with evacuating the crew to limit the spread.

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Navy’s top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier’s skipper in April.

But after it was reviewed up the chain of command, James McPherson, who succeeded Modly as acting Navy secretary, ordered a fuller investigation.

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Image of article 'Turla Hacker Group Steals Antivirus Logs To See If Its Malware Was Detected'

Turla Hacker Group Steals Antivirus Logs To See If Its Malware Was Detected

An anonymous reader quotes a report from ZDNet: Security researchers from ESET have discovered new attacks carried out by Turla, one of Russia's most advanced state-sponsored hacking groups.

ESET researchers say the attacks targeted three high-profile entities, such as a national parliament in the Caucasus and two Ministries of Foreign Affairs in Eastern Europe.

The latest version, known as ComRAT v4, was first seen in 2017, however, in a report published today, ESET says they've spotted a variation of ComRAT v4 that includes two new features, such as the ability to exfiltrate antivirus logs and the ability to control the malware using a Gmail inbox.

The first of these features is the malware's ability to collect antivirus logs from an infected host and upload it to one of its command and control servers.

The exact motives of a hacker group will always remain unclear, but Matthieu Faou, the ESET researcher who analyzed the malware, told ZDNet that Turla operators might be collecting antivirus logs to "allow them to better understand if and which one of their malware sample was detected."

Russia's Tu-22M3M Supersonic Bomber: Now Hypersonic

During the upgrades, the bombers will get not only the new avionics but also the capability to employ new missiles including the X-32 (Kh-32), a supersonic air-launched cruise missile that has a range of 600 to 1,000km.

This second prototype successfully performed its maiden flight in March of this year, and the aim of that flight was to assess the takeoff and landing characteristics, as well as to test the information control system.

A second prototype of the Russian Air Force's Tu-22M3M supersonic bomber underwent trials at hypersonic speeds during a fourth test flight, Russian state media reported.

This second prototype successfully performed its maiden flight in March of this year, and the aim of that flight was to assess the takeoff and landing characteristics, as well as to test the information control system.

A second prototype of the Russian Air Force's Tu-22M3M supersonic bomber underwent trials at hypersonic speeds during a fourth test flight, Russian state media reported.

History Shows Why Naval Mines Are No Joke

Several years later during the Gulf War, the Navy’s helicopter carrying USS Tripoli was disabled by a mine attack, which exploded at 25-foot hole in the forward starboard section of the ship, according to a 1991 UPI news report.

For instance, an interesting 2015 essay from Naval History and Heritage Command, called “Mine Warfare,” recalls a catastrophic mine attack on U.S. forces during the Korean War in the 1950s.

Industry and Navy countermine technology developers are all too aware of the toll mine warfare has taken on U.S. forces throughout history.

Large numbers of blue or deep water mines are an increasing threat, according to Navy weapons developers who are refining new mine-warfare strategies.

Although technology has long since progressed since even the days of the Gulf War in the early 90s, both shallow and deep water mines continue to present a serious problem for U.S. Navy ships on patrol—just as they have done throughout the years.

Image of article 'Hacking group builds new Ketrum malware from recycled backdoors'

Hacking group builds new Ketrum malware from recycled backdoors

While the Ketrum 1 sample that came with a faked January 7, 2010, timestamp shows that the hacking group implemented most of the features available in the two older backdoors, the newer Ketrum 2 variant drops most of the fluff and kept the most common Ke3chang backdoor functionalities.

A feature comparison between the older Ketrican and Okrum backdoors and the new Ketrum backdoor samples is embedded below.

A new report from Intezer researchers shows how they discovered three Ketrum backdoor samples this month on the VirusTotal platform and associated them with the Chinese cyberspies after noticing that it reused both code and features from Ke3chang's Ketrican and Okrum backdoors.

The Ke3chang hacking group historically believed to be operating out of China has developed new malware dubbed Ketrum by merging features and source code from their older Ketrican and Okrum backdoors.

Between 2012 and 2015 Ke3chang used the TidePool RAT-like malware to collect info after exploiting the CVE-2015-2545 Microsoft Office security flaw, while from 2016 to 2017 the group deployed the RoyalCLI and RoyalDNS backdoors in attacks targeting the UK government, attempting to steal military tech and governmental info.

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Two Chinese Aircraft Carriers Are Headed to the South China Sea

At several points, Chinese maneuvers in the South China Sea area, coupled with visible moves to place weapons and war assets in the region, have prompted the U.S. to conduct “Freedom of Navigation” operations and sail within the 12 mile territorial boundaries of areas claimed by China.

However, the accusatory tone in the essay, taken within a broader context of appearing to favor improved relations between the U.S. and China, appears to conflict with a report in The Daily Mail stating that China is sending its Liaoning and Shandong carriers into areas of the South China Sea for drills.

The essay, titled “A New Cold War between China, U.S., far from Inevitable,” states “competition is and always will be a part of international relations and therefore, by extension, a part of China-US relations, but the shift from engagement with China to all-out strategic competition sets the stage for a dangerous future.”

Meanwhile, at the same time, China is reportedly sending two aircraft carriers for war games to Northern portions of the South China Sea, sparking continued concerns about threats to Taiwan.

Meanwhile, at the same time, China is reportedly sending two aircraft carriers for war games to Northern portions of the South China Sea, sparking continued concerns about threats to Taiwan.

US Navy has released footage of a laser weapon shooting down a drone

A laser weapon capable of shooting down flying drones has been deployed for the very first time by the US Navy, though only for demonstration purposes.

Installed aboard the USS Portland, the 150-kilowatt-class Technology Maturation Laser Weapon System Demonstrator (LWSD) was used to successfully disable an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) on May 16, 2020, in what was the first use of a high-energy class solid-state laser weapon.

“By conducting advanced at-sea tests against UAVs and small crafts, we will gain valuable information on the capabilities of the Solid State Laser Weapons System Demonstrator against potential threats,” said US Navy Captain Karrey Sanders in a statement.

Developed by Northrup Grumman, the LWSD is intended to be installed on the Navy’s amphibious ships and is part of a range of laser weapons that the US military hopes to deploy in the near future.

The Navy says its “ships face an increasing number of threats in conducting their missions, including UAVs, armed small boats, and adversary intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems,” hence the need for weapons capable of eliminating these threats.

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Australia-India Naval Cooperation and the Islands of the Indo-Pacific

A joint coordinated effort utilizing island territories through mutual access agreements would allow India and Australia to expand their presence and maritime domain awareness missions beyond their respective individual capacities.

Access to these islands would not only strengthen Australia’s interests in the eastern Indian Ocean but also provide a platform to increase its military engagement in the rest of the Indian Ocean — a current challenge in Australia’s Indian Ocean policy.

While Canberra also has staging options in Darwin, Australia and Butterworth, Malaysia, for surveillance missions, access to the Andaman and Nicobar Islands would bring Australia to the heart of the Indian Ocean.

As India and Australia prepare for a virtual summit next month between prime ministers amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, a possible strategic initiative could involve the cooperative use of their respective island territories in the Indian Ocean for strategic purposes.

Similarly, India stands to gain strategically with access to the Cocos Islands, expanding its reach and presence in the southeast Indian Ocean across the Indonesian straits and into the Pacific.

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Lots of Firepower: How America's M2 4.2-Inch Mortar Crushed the Axis

Not far behind him sat Company C, 2nd Chemical Mortar Battalion, equipped with the M2 4.2-inch mortar.

Since the intent was to utilize the new mortar solely for chemical weapons (smoke being considered a chemical weapon of sorts), the weapon came under the control of the U.S. Army Chemical Warfare Service.

In 1935, the War Department stopped all production of the weapon and later designated the smaller 81mm mortar as standard issue for chemical battalions.

The M2’s potential as a close support weapon was obvious, and the chemical branch immediately began campaigning to adopt the high-explosive ammunition; while smoke munitions were of obvious use, the war thus far had seen no use of poison gas.

Unit commanders were generally very positive about the effectiveness of the chemical mortar support, smoke, and high explosive, one even calling it “the most effective single weapon used in support of infantry.”

Image of article 'SpaceX and US Army sign deal to test Starlink broadband for military use'

SpaceX and US Army sign deal to test Starlink broadband for military use

"The Army's command operations centers access geostationary satellites via large dishes that are mounted on trailers and not very mobile," SpaceNews wrote, while quoting one Army official as saying the current system is like a "soda straw" because it doesn't provide enough throughput to support its users.

The Army source who talked to SpaceNews said the deal with SpaceX will "allow the Army to understand potential applications of state-of-the art advancements in commercial RF SATCOM such as the new Starlink LEO constellation and modern SATCOM terminal developments capable of tracking LEO satellites."

"The Army in this case wants to be able to assess the performance of the Starlink low-Earth orbit [LEO] Internet service when connected to military systems.

The US Army has signed a three-year deal with SpaceX to test the company's Starlink satellite-broadband service, SpaceNews reported today.

"To use LEO broadband like Starlink the Army will need flat-panel antennas to track thousands of satellites.

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When U-2 Spy Planes Landed on an Aircraft Carrier

This was likely one of the only times U-2s were used from aircraft carriers—though we will likely never know for certain due to the secretive nature of the U-2G’s missions.

The Ranger’s crew was cut to about half, and the U-2s were kept belowdecks out of sight—only essential CIA personnel and some Naval crew were allowed to see the modified spy planes.

An aircraft carrier, the USS Ranger was tasked with getting two U-2Gs into the vicinity of French Polynesia undetected.

If a U-2 could be launched and recovered from an aircraft carrier, U-2s could reach most of the globe, without having to negotiate the political complexities of housing spy planes on foreign soil.

In the 1960s, the CIA modified two U-2s to land on aircraft carriers—and they were used to spy on France.

Operation Moked: How Israel Surprised The World By Destroying Egypt's Air Force

This was also nothing new: for two years, Egyptian, Syrian and Jordanian radar had tracked Israeli aircraft—though never this many Israeli aircraft—taking off every morning on this same flight path, and then disappearing from their scopes before they returned to base.

But the Israeli Air Force could pit only two hundred aircraft, almost all French models (the United States wouldn’t sell aircraft to the IAF until 1968), against six hundred Arab planes, including many Soviet-supplied MiG fighters.

Meanwhile, the commanders of the Egyptian armed forces and air force were away from their posts on an inspection tour, flying aboard a transport as the Israeli aircraft came in (scared that their own antiaircraft gunners would mistake them for Israelis and blast them out of the skies, the commanders had ordered that Egyptian air defenses not fire on any aircraft while the transport plane was in the air).

The truth was that Israeli ground crews had practiced the rearming and refueling of returning aircraft in less than eight minutes, which allowed the strike aircraft of the first wave to fly in the second.

But destroying the Arab air forces didn’t just mean that Israeli troops could operate without air attack; it also meant that Israeli aircraft could relentlessly bomb and strafe Arab ground troops, which turned the Egyptian retreat from Sinai into a rout.

These 5 Weapons Explain Why America's Army Is So Powerful

So it is easy to forget that the U.S. Army is no slouch, either, at the anti-tank missile game.

The U.S. Army's hard-hitting, self-propelled howitzers have taken a backseat in America's recent small wars.

Equipped with a 30-millimeter cannon, Hellfire missiles and sophisticated sensors, the Apache combines speed, firepower and range that allows the Army to strike enemies long before they come within firing distance of Army ground troops.

Nonetheless, today's U.S. Army can generate an astonishing amount of firepower and deliver it in a variety of settings from small-war counterinsurgency to big-war mechanized combat.

Here's What You Need To Remember: Today's U.S. Army can generate an astonishing amount of firepower and deliver it in a variety of settings from small-war counterinsurgency to big-war mechanized combat.

Airbus' Eurofighter Typhoon Could Become Germany's Next Air Defense Killer

The German air force will select its new fighter aircraft in early 2020.

Airbus is offering Germany a version of the Typhoon multi-role fighter aircraft that can perform the suppression of enemy air-defenses, or SEAD, mission.

The German air force will select its new fighter aircraft in early 2020, German minister of defense Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer announced in late September 2019.

In offering a SEAD version of the Typhoon, Airbus clearly anticipates that Germany will want to preserve its niche defense-suppression capability.

Aside from Germany and Italy’s Tornado ECRs, the only dedicated SEAD aircraft in the NATO inventory are the roughly 150 EA-18Gs that Boeing is building for the U.S. Navy.

Image of article 'Video Footage of a U.S. Navy Ship Taking Down a Drone With a Laser Weapon'

Video Footage of a U.S. Navy Ship Taking Down a Drone With a Laser Weapon

“The Solid State Laser Weapons System Demonstrator is a unique capability the Portland gets to test and operate for the Navy while paving the way for future weapons systems, “ said Sanders.

The Navy revealed that its ships have been facing an increasing number of threats "including UAVs, armed small boats, and adversary intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems."

"By conducting advanced at sea tests against UAVs and small crafts, we will gain valuable information on the capabilities of the Solid State Laser Weapons System Demonstrator against potential threats," U.S. Navy Capt. Karrey Sanders, the ship's commanding officer, said in a statement.

RELATED: WATCH THE US NAVY TEST ITS SEABORNE DEATH LASERS The USS Portland (LPD-27) used its Technology Maturation Laser Weapon System Demonstrator (LWSD) against an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) last week, the Navy revealed.

A U.S. Navy ship destroyed a flying drone with a laser weapon in the Pacific Ocean and there is an actual video of the scene released on Twitter by the U.S. Navy.

The U.S. Navy's Stealth USS Zumwalt Destroyer Finally Fires Its Guns

It has faced other delays and cost overruns, but the Navy has called the delivery of the warship a "major milestone," as it had originally planned to buy more than two dozen of the stealth destroyers, which has been reduced to just three.

The test firing on board USS Zumwalt was the first large caliber weapons firing event for the new class of destroyers.

Sailors aboard the stealthy destroyer, working with engineers and technicians from the Navy Surface Warfare Centers, successfully executed the test, which was conducted at the Naval Air Weapons Center Weapons Division Sea Test Range, Point Mugu last week.

This is why it was a big deal that the U.S. Navy's USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), which departed on its first operation in April, has now finally actually concluded a structural test fire of its Mark 46 MOD 2 Gun Weapons System (GWS).

It has faced other delays and cost overruns, but the Navy has called the delivery of the warship a "major milestone," as it had originally planned to buy more than two dozen of the stealth destroyers, which has been reduced to just three.

How Soviet-American Cooperation Over Operation Frantic Foreshadowed the Coming Cold War

The subject of shuttle bombing was again broached at the Moscow Conference in October 1943, when the newly arrived chief of the U.S. military mission to Russia, General Deane, discussed it with Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov.

American leaders proposed the use of Russian bases with a number of general goals in mind: strategic and tactical bombing in distant Eastern Europe; stretching Nazi air-defense forces, especially prior to the Allied invasion of France; and demonstrating to the Soviets, who had no long-range bombing force, the sincerity and effectiveness of the U.S. war effort, thereby improving Soviet-American relations and the exchange of information.

Since Hitler controlled most of continental Europe, air bases would have to be in the British Isles, the Mediterranean area, and the Soviet Union to make shuttle bombing fully effective.

The 64 B-17s at Poltava and 65 other bombers and 64 fighters of the U.S. Fifteenth Air Force that landed at two neighboring bases were the spearhead of Operation Frantic, America’s World War II effort to strike at enemy targets in Eastern Europe from England and Italy using bases in the Soviet Union to refuel and rearm.

Greetings were exchanged with American Ambassador W. Averell Harriman and U.S. military mission chief Maj. Gen. John R. Deane, as well as with other Russian officers on hand for the occasion.

Are Aircraft Carriers The Best Way To Project American Power

While the U.S. has been slower than many would have liked to adapt to the new array of anti-access threats , the development of fifth and sixth generation stealth aircraft, as well as the eventual procurement of long range, carrier-based strike zones, can help restore the usefulness of the CVN-78 class, even if anti-access weapons drive the carriers further out to sea.

Indeed, no U.S. carrier since World War II has ever needed to directly challenge such a system.

People have predicted the obsolescence of the aircraft carrier since the end of World War II.

Just as the U.S. government has determined to make this investment, numerous analysts have argued that the increasing lethality of anti-access/area denial systems ( but also and Iran) has made the aircraft carrier obsolete.

Here's What You Need To Remember: Just because flat-decked aircraft carrying ships will likely be with us does not mean that the Ford class, which emphasizes high-intensity, high technology warfare, represents an ideal investment of U.S. defense capital.

Image of article 'US Navy tests new laser weapon system, destroys aircraft mid-flight'

US Navy tests new laser weapon system, destroys aircraft mid-flight

US Navy tests the first high-energy class solid state laser, capable of blasting planes out of the sky mid-flight The US Navy has tested a new laser weapon system, with the video below showing the docked USS Portland testing its new laser weapon system that is capable of blowing an aircraft up out of the sky mid-flight.

In the video above, the US Navy has its USS Portland testing "the first system-level implementation of a high-energy class solid state laser".

In a statement, Capt. Karrey Sanders, commanding officer of Portland explained: "By conducting advanced at sea tests against UAVs and small crafts, we will gain valuable information on the capabilities of the Solid State Laser Weapons System Demonstrator against potential threats".

This isn't the first time that the US Navy has tested a laser weapon system, where in 2017 there was a live-fire exercise of a 30-kilowatt laser system by the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf.

CNN reports that at the time, Lt. Cale Hughes, a laser weapons system officer, described how the system works.

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US Navy downs drone with a friggin laser [Video

“By conducting advanced at sea tests against UAVs and small crafts, we will gain valuable information on the capabilities of the Solid State Laser Weapons System Demonstrator against potential threats,” said US Navy Captain Karrey Sanders, the ship’s commanding officer, in the press release.

The 150-kilowatt-class Laser Weapon System Demonstrator (LWSD), made by Northrup Grumman, took the drone out in seconds.

On Friday the Navy announced the recent successful test of a new solid-state laser aboard the amphibious transport ship USS Portland.

The US Navy just demonstrated that capability when it downed a drone in tests of a new ship-mounted laser in the Pacific Ocean.

The Navy aims to deploy lasers against other threats as well, including long-range missiles, which could overwhelm the defenses of a carrier group in the heat of combat.

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How Will the U.S. Navy Deal with the Growing Sea Mine Threat

“We have significant gaps in our capability to defeat one hundred thousand Russian and Chinese mines which will not be laid in shallow water,” Maj. Gen. David Coffman, Director of Naval Expeditionary Warfare, told an audience in 2019 at the Surface Navy Association Symposium.

The approach is focused on both littoral minefields as well as higher-tech deep water mines associated with threats posed by great powers as well, according to senior service leaders.

The growing modern mine threat is so significant, that the Navy has been fast-tracking a wide range of new countermine attack and defense strategies.

The approach is focused on both littoral minefields as well as higher-tech deep water mines associated with threats posed by great powers as well, according to senior service leaders.

The growing modern mine threat is so significant, that the Navy has been fast-tracking a wide range of new countermine attack and defense strategies.